LEGAL MAXIMS AND THEIR SHORT EXPLANATIONS


LEGAL
MAXIMS AND THEIR SHORT EXPLANATIONS

WRITTEN & COMPILED BY: CHARTAVILLE


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ACCUSARE NEMO SE DEBET [NISI CORAM DEO]: NO ONE OUGHT TO ACCUSE HIMSELF [EXCEPT TO GOD].

  • Also called the ‘right against self-incrimination’.
  • Similar to ‘Nemo tenetur seipsum accusare’.
  • An accused is fully entitled to plead ‘not guilty’ whatever the facts may be.
  • A witness may refuse to answer questions on the ground that a reply might incriminate him.
  • A confession is not admissible unless it is made freely and voluntarily. It must not be induced through promise or threat.
  • See R v Lagos, Miranda v Arizona and Mapp v Ohio.

 

ACTA EXTERIORA INDICANT SECRETA INTERIORA: THE OUTWARD ACTS SHOW THE SECRET INTENTIONS.

  • This involves the ascertainment of someone’s subjective interest/purpose motivating his/her actions, by considering what the immediate, proximate and reasonably to be anticipated consequences of such actions are and to reason that the person intends to accomplish them.
  • Facta non verba’ – actions speak louder than voice.

 

ACTIO PERSONALIS MORITUR CUM PERSONA: ANY RIGHT OF ACTION DIES WITH THE PERSON.

  • It applies to actions in form of ‘ex delicto’. ‘Delict’ meaning wrong/injury done to someone.
  • It is a common law rule which states that ‘if an injury were done either to the person or to the property of another for which damages only could be recovered in satisfaction, the action died with the person to whom or by whom the wrong was done.
  • In case of injury to the person, if either party dies, no action can be supported either by or against the executors or other representatives.
  • Thus, going by this maxim, it would be better for a motorist to kill rather than merely injure a pedestrian who is unemployed, unmarried, childless and an orphan.
  • The relevance of this principle has been substantially removed by statutes which allow a deceased’s estate to pursue the litigation.
  • It does not apply to personal action founded on contract.
  • It now seems to be generally confined to ‘defamation’.
  • See Phillip v Homfray, Ayodele v Ore and Kareem v Wema Bank Ltd.

 

ACTORE NON PROBANTE, ABSOLVITUR REUS: AN ACTION NOT PROVED, ABSOLVES THE GUILTY.

  • When the plaintiff/prosecution does not prove his case, judgment is for the defendant/accused.
  • The same principle applies to an appellant if the judges are equally divided in their decisions.
  • See Famuroti v Agbeke and Awomuti v Salami.

 

ACTUS DEI NEMINI FACIT INJURIAM: AN ACT OF GOD CAUSES LEGAL INJURY TO NO ONE.

  • The law holds no man responsible for the act of God’ ~Herbert Broom.
  • The loss from an injury caused thereby must be borne by the victim.
  • It refers to an injury, inevitable as a result of an act of God, which no industry can avoid or policy prevent.
  • Supposing a storm causes Mr A’s car to land on, thereby damaging Mr B’s house, Mr B cannot claim damages from Mr A.
  • See Omotayo v Arbuckie Smith & Co. Ltd.

 

ACTUS NON FACIT REUM, NISI MENS SIT REA: AN ACT DOES NOT MAKE GUILT, UNLESS THE MIND BE GUILTY.

  • The intent and the act must both concur to constitute a crime.
  • Similar to Nemo cogitationis poenam patitur: No one shall be punished for his thoughts alone.
  • The existence of a criminal mind may be negated with the defences of: *Mistake *Accident *Compulsion *Consent *Claim of right.
  • A lunatic may however be found guilty of crime, but will not be executed and only kept in custody for lack of ‘real’ intent [i.e. mens rea].
  • See R v Nasamu, Sweet v Parsely and The State v Adelenwa.

 

AFFIDAVIT: HE SWORE.

  • Or ‘FOR HE HAS DECLARED UPON OATH’.
  • A written sworn statement of fact voluntarily made by an affiant or deponent under an oath/affirmation administered by an authorised person.
  • Witnessed by a solicitor or a commissioner of oaths.
  • It may not be admissible as evidence; must be backed up.
  • The content should be only within the knowledge of the affiant.
  • If discovered false, with the intent to deceive; may lead to a charge of perjury.

 

ARMA IN ARMATOS SUMERE JURA SINUNT: THE LAW PERMITS THE TAKING UP OF ARMS AGAINST THE ARMED.

  • The use of arms is only lawful if it is necessary as a form of self-defence, to prevent or repel the commission of a forcible entry or an atrocious crime.
  • See Nwuguru v The State, R v Igwe and The Queen v Jinobu.

 

AUDI ALTERAM PARTEM: HEAR THE OTHER SIDE.

  • First enacted in the Magna Carta, 1215.
  • Similar to ‘AUDITUR ET ALTERA PARS’.
  • No person shall be condemned, punished or have any property or legal right compromised by a law court without being heard.
  • It includes habeas corpus, right to receive notice of hearing and to be given an opportunity to be represented or heard.
  • It is a principle of fair-hearing; that both party shall respond to the evidence against them.
  • It is considered a principle of fundamental justice or equity.
  • The ancient Greek dramatists considered ‘hear both sides’ as part of ‘common wisdom’.
  • Today, legal systems differ on whether a person can be convicted in absentia.
  • Even God, it is said, allowed Adam to make his defence before passing judgment.
  • See King v Chancellor, Cooper v Wandsworth Board of Works, Fawehinmi v LPD committee per Kayode Eso JSC, R v Chancellor of Cambridge Univerisity, Adedeji v Public Service Commission, Akande v The state, adeigun v A.G. Oyo state and Udemah v Nig. Coal Corp.

COMMODUM EX INJURIA SUA, NEMO HABERE DEBET: OUT OF HIS OWN WRONG, NO ONE OUGHT TO HAVE ADVANTAGE.

  • Mostly applied in insurance cases whereby the assured inflicts injury on himself, spouse or property to make a fraudulent claim.
  • See Lek v Matthews and Cole v Accident Assurance Co. Ltd.

 

CORPUS DELICTI: BODY OF CRIME.

  • Plural: ‘Corpora delicti’.
  • A principle that a crime must have been proven to have occurred before a person can be convicted of committing that crime.
  • It is ‘the fact of a crime having been actually committed’ ~Black’s law dictionary.
  • Out-of-court confession of a defendant is insufficient as evidence.
  • An accused cannot be convicted solely upon an accomplice’s testimony.
  • If a person disappears and cannot be contacted, a ‘missing person’ case is initiated. A ‘body’ of evidentiary items must be obtained to establish that the missing individual has indeed been murdered.
  • Misinterpretation: in the case of British serial killer, John George Haigh, he destroyed the bodies of his victims with acid thinking that in the absence of a corpse, murder could not be proven.

 

DOMUS SUA CINQUE EST TUTISSIMUM REFUGIUM: A MAN’S HOUSE IS HIS SAFEST RETREAT.

  • The house of everyone is to him a castle/fortress for his safety, and defence against injury and violence.
  • A house” includes a rented house.
  • In R v Hussay, the tenant was justified to have shot his landlord who tried to forcibly eject him after a quit-notice.
  • See also The Queen v Eyo and R v Ebi.

 

 

 

 

EX PARTE: FOR ONE PARTY ONLY.

  • Or ‘OUTSIDE THE AWARENESS OF A PARTY.’
  • It refers to the proceedings where one of the parties has not received notice and, therefore is neither present nor represented.
  • It is not ex parte, if a notice is received but the person chose not to attend.
  • However, some jurisdictions expand it to mean any proceeding that goes undefended.
  • One of the parties applies to the court and is awarded without the knowledge of the other party who may be bound or affected by the proceeding/verdict.
  • Ex parte applications often seek‘court injunction’.
  • It gives room for injustice.
  • It is not common in the adversarial system.
  • Urgency often leads to it.
  • The party present in court must/is expected to present the case fairly.

EX TURPI CAUSE NON ORITUR ACTIO: OUT OF A BASE/DISGRACEFUL/ILLEGAL CAUSE, AN ACTION DOES NOT ARISE.

  • “No polluted hand shall touch the pure foundation of justice.”
  • “He who comes to equity, must come with clean hands” [a maxim of equity].
  • It means redress shall not be granted to persons involved in an illegal deal.
  • Illegality in an agreement renders it wholly void of legal effect.
  • See Canfailla v Chahin, Stevens v Gourley and Onyiuke v Okeke.

 

HABEAS CORPUS: MAY YOU HAVE THE BODY.

  • Habeas: 2nd person singular present subjunctive active of ‘habere’ – to have.

Corpus: accusative singular of ‘corpus’; plural is ‘corpora’.

  • Fully written as ‘habeas corpus ad subjiciendum.’
  • Also called ‘the great writ’.
  • It is a writ [legal action] that requires a person under arrest to be brought before a judge.
  • It ensures that a prisoner can be released from unlawful detention.
  • The remedy can be sought by the prisoner and anyone coming to his aid.
  • It is addressed to the prison custodian.
  • Others, aside the detainee, can write the petition because he might be held ‘incommunicado’.
  • It may be suspended due to a ‘national emergency’.
  • Types: *Habeas corpus ad deliberandum et recipiendum.

*Habeas corpus ad faciendum et recipiendum (or cum causa).

*Habeas corpus ad prosequendum.

*Habeas corpus ad respondedum.

*Habeas corpus ad testificandum.

 

INTER ARMA, LEGES SILENT: IN THE MIDST OF ARMS, THE LAW IS SILENT.

  • First written by Cicero in his oration; ‘Pro Milone’, as ‘Silent enim leges inter arma’.
  • “The laws will thusnot be silent in time of war, but they will speak with a somewhat different voice” ~ChiefJustice William Rehnquist.
  • “The clatter of arms drowns out the voice of the law” ~Henry David Thoreau.
  • It applies between different states, during civil disturbances or a coup d’état.

 

INTEREST REIPUBLICAE UT SIT FINIS LITIUM: IT CONCERNS THE STATE THAT THERE BE AN END TO LAWSUITS.

  • Or ‘IT IS FOR THE GENERAL WELFARE THAT A PERIOD BE PUT TO LITIGATION’.
  • In effect, the law does not encourage prolonged litigation.
  • The wealthy might cause nuisance to the poor if litigation is not restricted.
  • Hence, the court expects the parties to come prepared and present their points of differences as whole and not in bits.
  • See Ijale v Leventis Co. Ltd and Agu v Ikwibe.

 

JUDEX NON REDDIT PLUS QUAM QUOD POTENS IPSE REQUIRIT: A JUDGE DOES NOT GIVE MORE THAN THAT WHICH THE PLAINTIFF ASKS.

  • If a plaintiff claims the sum of ₦10 as debt from the defendant, the judge cannot grant more even if evidence reveals it’s actually ₦15.
  • See Khawam v Elias and Horizon Ltd v Wasurum.

 

JUDICIS EST IUS DICERE, NON DARE: THE JUDGE DECLARES (EXISTING) LAW, AND DOES NOT MAKE NEW ONES.

  • Under our constitution, the court can only interpret legislations: See Section 4 of CFRN.
  • See Abioye v Yakubu.

 

LEX DILATIONES SEMPER EXHORRET: THE LAW ALWAYS ABHORS DELAYS.

  • ‘Justice delayed is justice denied’ ~William Gladstone.
  • See Usikaro v Itsekiri [Land Trustee.]

 

LEX NON COGIT IMPOSSIBILIA: THE LAW DOES NOT COMPEL THE DOING OF IMPOSSIBILITIES.

  • The law which is founded on good sense and reasoning cannot possibly direct that impossible things be done.
  • See: ‘nemo tenetur ad impossible

 

MANDAMUS: WE ORDER.

  • A judicial remedy or an order from a superior court to a subordinate court, corporation or public authority to do or not to do some specific act which that body is obliged under law to do or refrain from doing.
  • Types: *Alternative *Peremptory *Continuing.
  • Example: In December 2009, Falana, in a suit against the Attorney General, issued for a writ of mandamus compelling Yar’adua to transmit a written declaration to the Senate President and speaker of House of Representatives empowering Jonathan as Acting President [in line with Section 145 of CFRN].

 

NEMO DAT QUOD HABET: NO ONE GIVES WHAT HE DOES NOT HAVE.

  • Sometimes called the ‘nemo dat’ rule.
  • It states that the purchase of a possession from someone who has no ownership right to it also denies the purchaser any ownership right to it also denies the purchaser any ownership title.
  • A person who is not the legitimate owner of an item cannot despatch it to another person.
  • Often stays valid even if the purchaser is not aware.
  • There are exceptions, though, which aim to give a degree of protection to bona fide purchasers as well as original owners.
  • Section 27, Sale of Goods Act: anybody purchasing something without the consent of the legitimate owner only attains the same rights to the item as the dishonest seller.
  • Section 26(1): a buyer from a non-owner obtains no better title than the seller.
  • Exceptions: *Mercantile agent *Sale by joint-owners *voidable contract *Sale by an unpaid seller *Termination of offer *Quasi-contract.

 

NEMO DEBET BIS VIXARI PRO UNA ET ENDEM LITIUM: NO ONE OUGHT TO BE TWICE VEXED (SUED) FOR ONE AND THE SAME CAUSE.

  • Similar to‘NEMO BIS PUNITUR PRO UNO (EODEM) DELICTO’ – No one should be twice punished for one wrong.
  • Similar to the principle of Res judicata; in civil matters.
  • It states that nobody should be twice sued or prosecuted upon one and the same set of facts, if there has been a final decision of a competent court.
  • However, an abortive or premature trial can be retried [see Windson v R].
  • In Connelly v DPP, the defendant tricked the judge by sending a dozen bottles of champagne with the compliment of the plaintiff, hence winning the case. If realised, the case could be re-tried on the ground of a mistrial.

 

NEMO DEBET ESSE JUDIX IN PROPRIA CAUSA: NOBODY OUGHT TO BE A JUDGE IN HIS OWN CAUSE.

  • This is a principle of natural law.
  • Popularly known as the rule against ‘bias’ i.e. anything which tends a person to decide a case other than on the basis of evidence.
  • It is based on the premise that it is against human psychology to decide a case against himself.
  • It accords with the dictum of Lord Hewart C.J. in R v Sussex; ‘Justice should not only be done, but also manifestly and undoubtedly be seen to be done.’
  • A biased decision is a nullity and is ‘coram non judice’.
  • May also be expressed as: *Nemo judex idoneus in propria causa est *Nemo judexin parte sua *Nemo judex in causa sua *In propria causa nemo judex.
  • The maxim crystallised in United Breweries Co. v Bath in which the Lord Chancellor (a shareholder in the company) decided in favour of the canal company.
  • In Wright v Crump [1790], the Mayor of Hereford, England; claimed title to a local house, arranged with a friend to lease it to him and then the friend brought a legal action for the ejectment of the occupants – Lord Mayor himself found for the claimant. Occupants appealed to the court of King’s Bench and the Mayor was sentenced to a term of imprisonment.
  • Exception [doctrine of necessity]: bias would not disqualify an officer if no other person is competent to act in his place e.g. Speaker of a house in impeachment proceedings.

 

NOLLE PROSEQUI: UNWILLING TO PURSUE.

  • Or ‘DO NOT PROSECUTE’.
  • It is most often used in criminal cases.
  • It is called ‘voluntary dismissal’ in civil cases.
  • Similar to it is ‘declination of prosecution’.
  • Its opposite is ‘involuntary dismissal’.
  • It is the prosecutor’s decision to voluntarily discontinue criminal charges either before trial or fore a verdict is rendered.
  • Judges seldom challenge such declarations.
  • It is not a guaranteefor the impossibility of a later re-indictment and nor is it a protection against ‘double jeopardy’ as the merits of the case were not adjudicated.
  • Reasons: *Weak or insufficient evidence.

     *Doubt as to the guilt of the defendant.

*Death of the accused.

 

 

 

 

PAR IN PAREM, NO HABET IMPERIUM: AN EQUAL POSSESSES NO POWER OVER AN EQUAL.

  • Also called the ‘doctrine of immunity from suit’.
  • This is a precept that a state cannot be sued in the courts of a foreign state, along-standing rule of customary international law identified with the personalimmunity of a foreign sovereign from suit.
  • It also applies to private individuals acting in their official capacity or representing their state e.g. USA v Guinto.
  • But when the public official does act contrary to law and injurious to the plaintiff, he is made accountable e.g. Shauf v Court of Appeals.

 

PLUS VALET UNUS OCCULATUS TESTIS, QUAM AURITI DECEM: ONE EYE WITNESS IS STRONGER THAN TEN HEARSAYS.

  • Based on the principle that, at all times, justice must be manifestly seen to have been done.
  • In law, ‘hearsay evidence’ is the opposite of ‘direct evidence’.
  • Also, any evidence given in the absence of an accused is not admissible against him.
  • See R v Samuels and Onwocha v The state.

 

PRO BONO PUBLICO: FOR THE GOOD OF THE PUBLIC.

  • Done or undertaken for public good without any payment or compensation.
  • Necessitas publica major est quam privata: public necessity has priority over a private need.

 

QUI NON IMPROBAT, APPROBAT: HE WHO DOES NOT DISAPPROVE, APPROVES.

  • Hence, a person in authority may be punished for covering a very serious crime known to him/her.
  • In English law, ‘MISPRISION’ is an offence which is to conceal a treason/felony.
  • See R v Aberg.

 

QUI PARCIT NOCENTIBUS INNOCENTES PUNIT: HE WHO SPARES THE GUILTY, PUNISHES THE INNOCENT.

  • For instance, the letting off of a rapist amounts to an ironical/literary punishment of the victim for her agony, violation of dignity and molestation.
  • However, the sentence of ‘cautioned and discharged’ is deemed a conviction and cannot be equated with sparing the guilty.

 

QUI PECAT EMBRIUS, LUAT SOBRIUS: HE WHO SINS WHEN DRUNK SHALL BE PUNISHED WHEN SOBER.

  • …even if a person drunk himself to the state of ‘dementia effectum’ (self-imposed madness), he will be punished for the crime after his sober moment; in common law i.e. before 1920 [introduction of the concept of mens rea].
  • The present legal position is that voluntary drunkenness which deprives a person of necessary mens rea cannot ground a criminal conviction.
  • If intent is coupled with violent passion, guilt is established as he is presumed to intend the natural consequence of the act.

 

QUICQUID PLANTATUR SOLO, SOLO CEDIT: WHATEVER IS AFFIXED TO THE SOIL, BECOMES PART OF IT.

  • In Onuwaje v Ogbeide, the plaintiff warned the defendant not to enter his land warning that it is his. The defendant went ahead to erecta building on the real estate; and then the plaintiff claimed title to it.
  • See also Atanda v Ajani and Tewogbade v Adeolu.

 

RES JUDICATA: MATTER ALREADY ADJUDGED.

  • Also called ‘claim preclusion’.
  • It is a legal doctrine meant to bar continued litigation between the same parties.
  • It may refer to a case which cannot be appealed because there has been a final judgment.
  • It cannot be raised whether in the same court or another.
  • Aims at preventing injustice and a waste of resources.
  • It prevents contradictory judgments and multiple recoveries of damages.
  • Requirements: *Identity in the thing at suit.

     *Identity of the cause at suit.

*Identity of the parties to the action.

*Identity in the designation of the parties involved.

*Whether the judgment was final.

*Whether the parties were given fair-hearing.

  • It includes two related concepts: *claim preclusion *issue preclusion or collateral                                                                                                               estoppel.
  • It may be ignored if there is a deficiency in due process in the adjudged case.
  • See Agu v Ikewide, Iyayi v Eyiegbe and Odjevwaje v Echanokpe.

 

SUB POENA: UNDER PUNISHMENT.

  • A writ by a government agency (court) compelling testimony by a witness or production of evidence under a penalty for failure.
  • The English term, ‘witness summons’ is used in England and Wales.
  • John Waltham, Bishop of Salisbury, createdthe writ.
  • Subpoenas are usually issued by the clerk of the court in the presiding judge’s name.
  • Types: *Subpoena ad testificandum: orders a person to testify before court or     face punishment, in person or by phone.

*Subpoena doces tecum: orders a person to bring physical evidence before the court or face punishment.

 

VOLENTI NON FIT INJURIA: THAT TO WHICH A MAN CONSENTS CANNOT BE CONSIDERED AN INJURY.

  • Expressly or impliedly assenting to an act makes it not to be actionable as a tort.
  • In another sense, no one can enforce a legal right which he has voluntarily waived/abandoned.
  • That party must have known of his legal rights and either by express language or sufficient overt act, tells the other party that he is not insisting on it (or them).
  • See Herd v Weardale Co. and Odua’s investment Co. Ltd v Talabi.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

OTHERS!

CONSTITUTIO RESPICIT FUTURA ET NON PRAETERITA:.

CONSUETUDO EST OPTIMA LEGUM INTERPRES:.

DAMNUM SINE INJURIA ESSE POTEST:.

FRAUS EST CELARE FRAUDEM:.

FRAUS ET JUS NUMQUAM COHABITANT:.

IN CRIMINALIBUS, PROBATIONES DEBENT ESSE LUCE CLARIORES:.

JUSTITIAE DILATIO EST QUAEDAM NEGATIO:.

LEGES AB OMNIBUS, INTELLEGI DEBENT:.

LEGES EXPONERE, NON FERRE, DEBET JUDEX:.

LEX INJUSTA NON EST LEX:.

LEX NON SCRIPTA: NON-WRITTEN LAW.

LEX NON VALET EXTRA TERRITIORIUM:.

LEX SCRIPTA: WRITTEN LAW.

MORBUS EST IMPEDIMENTUM IN LEGE:.

NEMO EST HAERES VIVENTIS:.

NULLUM CRIMEN SINE POENA:.

NULLUM PONA SINE LEGE:.

NULLUM SIMILE EST IDEM: NOTHING SIMILAR IS THE SAME.

QUID AB INITIO NON VALET, IN TRACTU TEMPORIS, NON CONVALESCIT:.

VIM VI REPELLERE LICET: IT IS ALLOWED TO REPEL FORCE WITH FORCE.


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YORUBA NAMES AND THEIR MEANING

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ARE YOU FROM A YORUBA TRIBE, AND YOU’VE ALWAYS WONDERED WHAT YOUR NAME MEANS? …OR YOU HAVE A YORUBA FRIEND WITH A STRANGE NAME, AND AFTER ALL ATTEMPTS, YOU CAN’T SEEM TO DECIPHER WHAT IT DENOTES? THEN THIS LONG LIST OF YORUBA DESIGNATIONS AND THEIR ENGLISH TRANSLATIONS IS MEANT FOR YOU.

ENJOY!

A
Aanuoluwapo; God’s mercy is great.
Aarin; refers to centre/middle
Aarinade; in the centre of the crown
Aarinola; the centre of wealth
Abayomi; the enemy would have gloated over me
Abejide; born during the rainy season
Abidemi; born before the fathers arrival
Abidoye; born before the arrival of a chieftaincy title
Abiodun; born during the festival
Abiola/ Abimbola/Abisola; one born into wealth
Abiona; born during a journey
Abioye/Abisoye; born into status/title
Abisogun; born during a war
Abisuga; one born into the palace
Abodunrin; one who walks in with the festival/holiday
Abosede/Abiose; born on the first day of the week
Adaramola; one who complements wealth with beauty
Ade; this refers to crown or royalty
Adebajo; the crown returns from a trip
Adebambo; the crown returns with me
Adebanjo; the crown fits me
Adebanke; the crown helps to pamper me
Adebankole; the crown assisted me to build a house
Adebayo; the crown meets with joy
Adebimpe; the crown birthed me complete
Adebisi; the crown has given birth to more
Adebiyi; the crown gave birth to this one
Adebola; the crown meets with wealth
Adeboro; the crown meets wealth
Adebowale; the crown has come home
Adeboye; the crown meets the title
Adeboyejo; the crown befits the title
Adebukola; the crown has added to wealth
Adebusoye; the crown has adds to status
Adedamola; the crown is mixed with wealth
Adedapo; crowns associate/affiliate
Adedaramola; the crown associates with (complements) wealth well
Adedayo; the crown has become joy
Adedeji; the crown has become two
Adediji; the crown has become a refuge
Adediran; the crown becomes hereditary
Adedoja; the crown has become a market
Adedokun; the crown has become (as wide as) the sea
Adedolapo; the crown holds wealth together
Adedotun; the crown has become fresh/new
Adedoyin; the crown has become honey
Adefemi; the crown loves me
Adefolake; the crown pampers with wealth
Adefolarin; the crown walks with wealth
Adefoluke; the crown pampers with God
Adefoyeke; the crown pampers with the title
Adegbenga; the crown elevates/uplifts
Adegbenro; the crown establishes
Adegbola; the crown carries wealth
Adegboyega; the crown has elevated the title
Adegoke; the crown ascends a height/hill
Adegoroye: the crown ascends to a title
Adegunte; the crown ascends the throne
Adeiye; the crown of salvation
Adejare; the crown has overcome
Adejobi; the crown gives birth together
Adejoke; the crown will together pamper this one
Adejoro; the crown enjoys (eats) wealth
Adejumo; the crown unites
Adejumobi; the crown unites to give birth to
Adejumoke; the crown unites to pamper
Adejuwon; the crown is greater than them
Adekanmi; I am entitled to the crown
Adekemi; the crown pampers me
Adekilekun; the crown makes the house full
Adekitan; the crown does not finish/end
Adekola; the crown collects wealth
Adekoyejo; the crown brings together titles
Adekunle; crowns fill the house
Adelabi; we gave birth to a crown
Adelana; the crown opens the way
Adelani; we own the crown
Adelanwa; it is a crown that we look for
Adeleke; the crown triumphs
Adelodun; the crown owns the festival
Adelowo; the crown has respect
Adeloye; the crown is (the essence) of a title
Ademola; the crown has been added to wealth
Ademolu; the crown has been added to the master
Adeniji; the crown has protection/refuge (to offer)
Adenike; the crown has (need of) care
Adeniran; the crown has history/lineage
Adeniyi; the crown has prestige/dignity
Adenola; the crown owns wealth
Adenrele; the crown is going home
Adenuga; the crown owns the palace
Adeoba; the crown of the king
Adeola; crown of wealth
Adeolu; the crown of God
Adeoti; the crown does not fade
Adeoye; a crown of title
Adepeju; the crown is full of honor
Adepero; the crown pacifies
Adepitan; the crown tells a story
Adepoju; crowns are many
Aderemilekun; the crown has dried my tears
Aderinsola; the crown walks into wealth
Aderiyike; the crown has found one to pamper
Aderonke; the crown has something to pamper
Aderoju; the crown has succor
Aderopo; the crown replaces
Adesanmi; the crown profits me
Adesewa; the crown makes beauty
Adesile; the crown opens a new house
Adesina; the crown has opened the way
Adesoji; the crown is revived
Adesokan; the crown is one
Adesola; the crown makes wealth
Adesoro; the crown makes wealth
Adesoye; the crown watches over the title
Adesupo; the crown aggregates
Adetola; the crown is the worth of wealth
Adetolu; the crown which belongs to God
Adetona; the crown gives direction
Adetoro; the crown is peaceful
Adetoun; the crown is worth strife
Adetoyebi; the crown is big enough to birth titles
Adetoyese; the crown has beautified the title
Adetunji; the crown has woken again
Adetutu; the crown is calm/soothing
Adewale; the crown has come home
Adewetan; the crown has being bath
Adewonuola; the crown has entered into wealth
Adewunmi; I am desirous of the crown
Adeyanju; the crown succeeds
Adeyato; the crown is different
Adeyemi; the crown befits me
Adeyemo; the crown befits a child
Adeyiga; the crown surrounds the palace
Adeyinka; the crown surrounds me
Adeyeye; the crown befits its titles
Adeyoye; the crown rejoices over the title
Adunade; the sweetness of the crown
Adunbi; one who is sweet to give birth to
Adunke; one who is sweet to pamper
Adunni; one who is sweet to have
Adura; means prayer
Aduramigba; my prayer has been answered
Afolabi; one born with wealth
Afolami; one who breathes with wealth
Afolarin; one who walks with wealth
Afolorunso; one kept under God’s protection
Agboola; the stage/platform of wealth
Aibinuola; one who is not antagonistic of wealth
Aje; a child born on monday
Ajibola; one who wakes up to meet wealth
Ajibade; one who wakes into royalty
Ajibike; we woke up to take care of this one
Ajirola; one who wakes to the sight of wealth
Akin; refers to warrior/valor
Akinbiyi; a warrior gave birth to this one
Akinbode; a warrior has arrived
Akinbola; valor meets with wealth
Akindele; the warrior has come home
Akinkunmi; valor fills me
Akinlabi; we gave birth to a warrior
Akinleye; valor has glory
Akinlolu; the Lord is Valor
Akinloye; valor is a title
Akinmade; the warrior takes the crown
Akinniyi; valor has dignity
Akinola; valor of wealth
Akinpelu; the warrior was one of them
Akinrinnola; the warrior walks in wealth
Akinsanmi; valor profits me
Akintayo; valor is the worth of joy
Akintola; valor is the worth of wealth
Akintoye; valor is the worth of title
Akintunde; the warrior has come again
Akinwunmi; warriors appeal to me
Akinyele; valor befits a home
Akinyemi; valor befits me
Akeju; one who is over pampered
Anjolaoluwa; we are enjoying (eating) the wealth of God
Alaba; the second child born after a set of twins
Alade; the crowned one
Alayo; one who is full of joy/merriment
Alarape; the one with family is complete
Ara; means family. It also means “to be a part of”
Aralola; family (relations) is wealth
Aramide; my family has come
Araoye; a part of the title
Aremu; is the name given to the first male child
Ariyo; one who is joy to behold
Asikooluwaloju; the Timing of God is best
Atinuke; a person who has been pampered from conception
Ayan; refers to drums/drumming.
Ayanbadejo; drumming complements the crown well
Ayandele; the drummer has come home
Ayantola; drumming is the worth of wealth
Ayantuge; drumming is the worth of the palace
Ayanyinka; drumming surrounds me
Ayo; means joy
Ayoade; the joy of the crown
Ayobade; joy meets with the crown
Ayobami; joy meets with me
Ayodabo;
Ayodeji; joy has doubled
Ayodele; joy has come home
Ayodiran; joy becomes hereditary
Ayoku; joy remains
Ayokunle; joy fills the house
Ayokunnumitetete; joy fills my insides completely/ joy saturates me
Ayomide /Ayomitide; my joy has come
Ayoola; the joy of wealth
Ayorinde; joy walks in
Ayotomi; joy is enough for me
Ayotola; joy is the worth of wealth
Ayotunde; joy has come again
B
Baba; means father or grandfather
Bababunmi; father gave me
Babajide; father has awoken
Babalola; father is wealth
Babarinsa; “father saw and ran”. Name given to a child whose father dies shortly after his birth
Babasola; father makes wealth
Babatola; father is the worth of wealth
Babatunde; father has come again
Babatunji; father had arisen/reincarnated
Babawale; father has come home
Babayeju; father confers dignity
Badejoko; one who sits with then crown
Bolajoko; one who sits with wealth
Bolatito; so wealth is this big?
Bolutife; it is as God desires
Botiwunoluwa; as God desires
D
Dideolu; the rising of God
Durodola; wait for wealth
Durojaiye; wait to enjoy (eat) life
Durosinmi; wait to bury me
E
Ebudola; insults have become wealth/honor
Ebunoluwa; gift of God
Emiola; the spirit of wealth
Eni; means person
Enilo; the person who went away
Eniola; person of wealth
Enitan; a person about whose birth a story is told
Eniolurunda; a person created/moulded (especially) by God
Eniolorunopa; a person who God will not kill
Enitanwa; a person who we have been waiting for
Ekundayo; tears have become joy
Ereola; the benefit/advantage of wealth
Erioluwa; evidence/testimony of God
Etoade; right of the crown
Ewaoluwa; beauty of God
Eyiloreoluwa; this is the favor of God
Eyitola; this (one) is the worth of wealth
F
Faramade; move closer to the crown
Fadekemi; make use if the crown to pamper me
Fadesewafunmi; make beauty from the crown for me
Fehintiola; rest/relax on wealth
Feyifoluwa; give this (one) to God
Fijinjesu/ Fijinoluwa; consecrated unto Jesus/God
Fiyinfoluwa; give prestige to God
Folagbade; receive a crown with wealth
Folashade; use wealth as a crown
Fowosade; use money as a crown
G
Gbekelolu; rest on God
Gbadewole; enter a place with the crown
Gbolagunte; ascend the throne with wealth
Gbolahan; show off wealth
Gbowoade; receive the crown
I
Ibidokun; family becomes (as wide as) the sea
Ibidun; child birth is sweet
Ibijoke; family pampers together
Ibikeye; childbirth brings honor
Ibikunle; birth (children) fill the house
Ibilola; childbirth is wealth
Ibisola; childbirth makes wealth
Ibiyemi; childbirth honors me
Ibirinade;
Ibironke; family has found who to pamper
Ibiolagbajosi; the place wealth converges at
Ibukunoluwa; blessing of God
Idowu; the name given to the child born after a set of twins
Idurotioluwa; the steadfastness/ abiding presence of God
Ife; means love
Ifeade; love of the crown
Ifedolapo; love holds wealth together
Ifejobi; love gave birth together
Ifeoluwakusi; the love of God abounds
Ifetayo; love is the worth of joy
Igbagboluwa; belief/faith of God
Ikeolu; the care of God
Ilesanmi; home benefits me
Imoleoluwa; light of God
Inioluwa; property of God
Ipadeola; assembly of wealth
Ipinuoluwa; decision of God
Iremide; my fortune/benefit has arrived
Iretiola; hope/anticipation of wealth
Iretioluwa; God’s hope
itanife; the story of love
Iteoluwakiisi; the throne of God is permanent
Itunuoluwa; comfort of God
Iwalewa; good character is beautiful
Iyanda; a selected being
Iya; refers to mother/grandmother
Iyabo; mother has come
Iyadunni; mother is sweet to have
Iyaniwura; mother is (as precious as) gold
Iyatunde; mother has returned
Iyanuoluwa; mercy of God
Iyinoluwa;Praise of God
Iyiola; the prestige of wealth
Iyunadeoluwa; beads (corals) of the crown of God
Jejelaiyegba; life should be treaded gently
Jejeolaoluwa; the wealth of God is gentle/restful
Jenrola; let me find wealth
Jokotade; sit with the crown
Jokotola; sit with wealth
K
Kalejaye; sit and eat (savor) life
Kasimawo; let’s wait and see (if this child will live long)
Kikelomo; children are destined for pampering
Kofoworade; he does not buy the crown with money
Kofoworola;he does not buy wealth with money
Kokumo; he/she will not die again
Koledowo; build a house in anticipation of wealth
Kosoko; theres no hoe
Koyinsola; put honey into wealth i.e. experience sweet wealth
Kukoyi; death rejects this (one)
M
Magbagbeoluwa; do not forget God
Majekodunmi; do not let it hurt (pain) me
Majemuoluwa; convenant of God
Makanjuola; do not be in a hurry to get wealthy
Malomo; don’t go away any more
Matanmi; don’t deceive me
Meraola; I did not buy wealth
Mobiyina; I have given birth to this one (at last!)
Mobolaji; I awoke with wealth
Modupe; I give thanks
Mofaderera; I adorn my body with a crown
Mofeoluwa; I love God
Mofeyisade; I use this (one) as a crown
Mofeyisola; I use this (one) as wealth
Mofogofolorun; I give God glory?
Mofolami; I breathe with wealth
Mofolusho/Mofolorunsho; I place in Gods protection/keeping
Mofopefolorun; I give thanks to God
Mogbadunola; I enjoy wealth
Mogbolade; I bring wealth home?
Mojirayo; I awoke to see joy
Mojirola; I awoke to see wealth
Mojisola; I awoke to wealth
Mojolaoluwa; I enjoy (eat) the wealth of God
Mojoyin; I enjoy (eat) honey
Mokolade; I have brought wealth
Molayo; I have joy
Monilola; I have a share in wealth
Mopelola; I am complete in wealth
Moradeke; I have found a crown to pamper
Moradeun; I have found a crown to pamper
Moradeyo; I have found a crown to rejoice over
Morakinyo; I have found a warrior to rejoice over
Morayo; I see joy
Morenike; I (have) found a person to pamper
Morenikeji; I have found my second (better) half
Moriojurereoluwagba; I have found God’s favor/ favor in God’s sight
Moriselade
Morohundiya; I find one to lessen my suffering
Morohunfola; I bestow something on wealth
Morohunfolu; I have found whom to give to God
Morohunkolafun; I have found whom to build wealth for
Morohunmubo; I have found someone to bring back
Morolake; I have found wealth to pamper
Morolayo; I have found wealth to rejoice over
Mosopefunolorun; I thank God
Mosunmola; I move close to wealth
Motilewa; I come from home
Motunrayo; I have once again seen joy
Moyoade; I rejoice over the crown
Moyosoreoluwa; I revel/rejoice in God’s favor
O
Oba; means king/ruler
Obafemi; the king loves me
Obasola; the king makes wealth
Obi; means family
Obileye; family has honor
Odun; means year
Odunayo; year of joy
Oduntan; a famed year in stories
Ojuolape; the face of wealth is complete/complete wealth
Okanlanwon; only male child amongst several female children
Okiki; means fame
Okikiade; fame of crown
Okikiimole; fame of light
Okikiola; fame of wealth
Ola; means wealth.
Olabamidele; wealth accompanies me home
Olabamiji/Olabanji; wealth wakes with me
Olabanwo; wealth looks after (this) for me
Olabimtan; wealth beget me complete
Olabisi; wealth has given birth to more
Olabode; wealth has arrived
Olabosipo; wealth returns to its position
Olabukunola; wealth adds fully to wealth
Oladahunsi; wealth responds to (me)
Oladapo; wealth associates/affiliates
Oladayo; wealth becomes joy
Oladega; wealth arrives the palace
Oladeinde/Olasehinde; wealth has returned
Oladeji/Oladimeji; wealth has becomes two/double
Oladejo; wealth becomes eight
Oladele; wealth has come home
Oladepo; wealth arrives its rightful position
Oladiji; wealth becomes a refuge
Oladipo/ Oladipupo; wealth has become plenty
Oladiran; wealth becomes a heritage
Oladitan; wealth becomes a story
Oladokun; wealth becomes (as wide as) the sea
Oladosu;wealth becomes month
Oladotun; wealth has become renewed
Oladunjoye; wealth is sweeter than titles
Oladunni; wealth is sweet to have
Oladurotoye; wealth stays with titles
Olafimihan; wealth shows me off
Olagoke; wealth ascends a hill
Olagunjoye; wealth is superior to titles
Olagunte; wealth ascends the throne
Olaide; wealth turns to come
Olaitan; wealth is inexhaustible
Olaiya; wealth of a mother
Olajide; wealth awakes to come
Olajire; wealth awakes to goodness
Olajobi/Olajumobi; wealth unites to give birth to
Olajumoke; wealth unites to pamper
Olakanmi; wealth has touched me/I am entitled to wealth
Olakitan; wealth does not finish
Olalekan; wealth has increased by one
Olalere; wealth has benefits
Olamakinde; wealth has brought the warrior
Olamide; my wealth has come
Olamiji; my wealth has awoken
Olanifesi; wealth has love for me
Olanipekun; wealth is endless
Olaniyan; wealth has its pride
Olaniyi; wealth is honorable
Olanlesi; wealth is increasing
Olanrele; wealth is going home
Olanrewaju; wealth is moving forward
Olansile; wealth opens a house
Olaoluwa; wealth of /from God
Olaosebikan; wealth does dwell exclusively in one place
Olaoti; wealth does not fade
Olaoye; wealth of the titled one
Olapademi; wealth meets with me
Olapeju; wealth is full of value
Olapitan; wealth tells a story
Olasimbo; wealth escorts me
Olasubomi; wealth has overwhelmed me.
Olasunmbo; wealth moves closer to me
Olasunkanmi; wealth moves nearer to touch me
Olasupo; wealth clusters together
Olatelemi; wealth follows me
Olatemina; I also deserve wealth
Olateju; wealth is abundant
Olatidoye; wealth has become a title
Olatokunbo; wealth from across the sea
Olatoun; wealth is worth strife
Olatunbosun; wealth has once more shifted (forward)
Olatunji; wealth has been revived
Olawale; wealth come home
Olawuwo; wealth is heavy
Olayemi; wealth befits me
Olayikanmi; wealth turned to touch me
Olayiwola; wealth twists into wealth
Olayinka; wealth surrounds me
Olayonu; wealth has burdens
Ololade; wealthy person has arrive
Olu/oluwa; means God. They are used interchangeably.
Oluade; God of the crown
Olubajo; God returns from a journey
Olubamise; God has done it for me
Olubanke; God helps me take care of (this child)
Oluwabukola; God adds to wealth
Olubukumi; God adds to me
Olubukunade; God adds to the crown
Oluwabunmi; God adds to me
Oluwabusayo; God adds to joy
Oluwabusola; God adds to wealth
Oludahunsi; God answers (me)
Oluwadairo; God establishes this one
Oluwadamilare; God exonerates/acquits me
Oluwadamilola ; God makes me wealthy
Oluwadamisi; God spares me/my life
Oluwadarasimi; God has been good to me
Oluwadayisi; God created this one
Oludemilade; God has crowned me
Oluwadetan; God has finally arrived
Oludolamu; God is the custodian of wealth
Oludotun; God becomes new
Olufadeke; God uses the crown to care for this one
Olufela; God expands wealth
Oluwafemi; God loves me
Olufeyikemi; God uses this (one) to care for me
Olufeyisayo; God uses this (one) to add to (my) joy
Oluwafikayo/ Olufikunayo; God adds completeness to (my) joy
Oluwafiresayo; God adds favor to (my) joy
Olufisayo; God adds to (my) joy
Olufolake; God takes care of this (one) with wealth
Olufolasade; God has uses wealth as a crown
Oluwafoyinsolami; God adds honey to my wealth
Olufumiso; God gave me (this child) to watch over
Olufunke; God gave me to pamper
Olufunmbi; God gave me to birth
Olufunmilade; God has given me a crown
Olufunmilola; God gives me wealth
Oluwafunmilorinotun; God has given me a new song
Olufunto; God gave me to raise/bring up
Olugbayilo; God takes this (one) to use
Olugbemileke; God makes me overcome
Oluwagbeminiyi; Gods honors me
Oluwagbotemi;God hears me
Oluwajimisayo;God wakes me into Joy
Oluwajomiloju; God has surprised me
Olukayode; God has brought joy
Oluwakemi; God pampers me
Olukolade; God brings wealth
Olukorede; God has brought good (to me)
Olukunmi; God completes me
Olulaanu; God has mercy
Oluwaleti; God has ears (to hear my request)
Oluwalomose; God knows how best to do it
Oluwalonike; God owns (this one) to take care of
Oluwalonimi; God owns me
Olumayokun; God makes joy complete
Olumayowa; God brings joy
Olumide; my God has come
Olumoyebo; God has brought titles
Oluwanifemi; God has love for me
Oluwapamilerinayo; God has caused me to laugh in joyfulness
Oluranti; God remembers
Oluwaremilekun;God has dried my tears
Oluropo; God replaces
Oluwarotimi; God is with me
Olusaanu; God wrought mercy
Olusanmi; God benefits me
Olusanya; God compensates for my suffering
Olusayo; God makes joy
Olusegun; God is victorious
Oluwasemilore; God has done me a favor
Oluwaseteminirere; God has done things for my good
Oluwaseun; thanks be to God
Oluwaseunbabaralaiyemi; God has done extremely great things for me
Oluwaseunayo; God has done something joyous
Oluseye; God makes dignity
Oluwaseyi; God has done this
Olusoga; God is the master
Olusoji; God has arisen
Olusola; God makes wealth
Oluwatemilorun; God contents me
Oluwatimilehin; God backs me up
Oluwatisetan; God has done completed “it”
Oluwatobi; God is big/mighty
Oluwatofunmi; God is enough for me
Olutomilola; God is enough wealth for me
Olutomiwa; God has come for me
Oluwatosin; God is worthy of worship
Olutoyelo; God worth more than titles
Oluwatoyosi; God is worth celebrating
Olutumibi; God rebirths me
Olutunde; God has returned
Oluwawapelumi; God is with me
Oluwemimo; God washes me pure
Oluwole; God enters the home
Oluwayemisi; God holds me in high regards/God honors me
Oluyomi; God delivered me
Omo; means child
Omobayi; child meet this
Omobolade; child comes (home) with wealth
Omobolaji; child awoke with wealth
Omobolanle; child met wealth at home
Omobonike; child has met with someone to pamper him/her
Omoborode; child has come with riches
Omodarani; child is good to have
Omodele; child has come home
Omodunbi; child is sweet to birth
Omodunni; a child is a sweet thing to have
Omofolabo; child comes with wealth
Omojola; child is greater than wealth
Omokeinde/ Omokeyinwa; child comes in last/brings up the rear
Omokeyede; child brings honor
Omokorede; child brings goodness
Omolabake; child whom we shall pamper
Omolabi; it’s a child we have given birth to
Omolara/ Omolebi; children are family
Omolayo; children are (a source) joy
Omolere; children are good
Omolewa; children are beauty
Omoleye; children are worthy
Omolola; children are wealth
Omololu; child is the master
Omoloro; children are riches
Omoloso; children are adornments/jewels
Omoluwabi; responsible child
Omoniyi; children are honorable
Omoniyun; children are (as precious as) coral beads
Omopariola; children are the completion are wealth
Omosalewa; child selected what home to be born into
Omosunsola; child moves nearer to wealth
Omotade; child is the worth of the crown
Omotara; child is the worth of family
Omotayo; child is the worth of (equivalent of) joy
Omotola/Omotolani; a child is as worthy as wealth
Omotoso; children are the worth of adornments
Omotunde; child has come again
Omowafola; child is deatined for wealth
Omowon; children are expensive/dear/precious
Omowunmi; child is appealing to me
Omoyeni; child befits a person
Oni; means person
Onifede; here comes the person of love
Onipede; here comes the consoler
Oniyide; here comes the dignified one
Ope; means thanks
Opemipo; I have many thanks to render
Opeoluwa; God’s gratitude
Opetunde; gratitude has come again
Opeyemi; thanks befits me/I should be grateful
Ore; means favor/goodness/kindness
Oreofe; free favor (undeserved favor). I.e. grace
Oreolu; favor of God
Òré; means friend
Òrédola; friendship becomes wealth
Òrélolu; God is a friend
Òréoluwa; friend of God
Òréotitololuwa; God is a true friend
Ori; means head
Oriade; head of crown
Oridola; head has become wealth
Orimolade; the head knows who should be crown
Oriola; head of wealth
Oromidayo; my case has become that of joy
Otito; means truth
Otitoju; the truth is greatest
Otitoluwa; the truth of God
Owo; this refers to money
Owodunni; money is sweet to own
Owolabi; money is what we have given birth to
Owoseni; money can be had
Oye; means titles
Oyebamiji/Oyebanji; the title awakes with me
Oyebode; title has come
Oyebola; title meets with wealth
Oyebolujo; the titles fit God
Oyedele; title comes home
Oyediran; title becomes hereditary
Oyegoke; title ascends a hill
Oyekanmi; it is my turn to receive the title
Oyekunle; title fills the house
Oyelakin; title is valor
Oyeleke;title overcomes
Oyelowo; title has respect
Oyemade; title with crown
Oyenike; title has need of pampering
Oyeniran; title has pedigree
Oyeniyi; title has dignity
Oyenola; title has wealth
Oyenuga; the title owns the palace
Oyerinde; title has walked in
Oyesanya; the title compensates for my suffering
Oyesina; the title has opened the wat
Oyetunde the title has come again
Oyeyemi; titles befit me
Oyeyipo; titles roll together/surround each other
Oyin; means honey. It refers also to sweetness
Oyindamola; honey is mixed into wealth
Oyindasola; honey pours into wealth
Oyinkansola; honey drips into wealth
P
Popoola; highway of wealth
S
Segilade; ornaments are crowns
Segilola; ornaments are wealth
Similolaoluwa; restfulness of the wealth of God
Sijuade; look in/open (your) eyes wide in the direction of the crown
Sijuwola; look in the direction of wealth
T
Tanimola; who knows the future
Taraoluwa; from Gods own body
Taiwo/Taiye; taste life/the world. The name given to the younger of a set of twins
Tejumade; fix your gaze on the crown
Temidayo; my life has taken a turn for good
Temilade; mine is the crown
Temilayo; mine is joy. Joy is mine
Temilolu; God is mine
Temitayo; my case is worth joyfulness
Temitope; mine (my circumstances) are worth thankfulness
Tewogbola; stretch out your hands to receive wealth
Tirenioluwa; it is yours, Lord!
Tinuade; from within the crown
Titilola; endless wealth
Titilayo; endless joy
Tiwalade; ours is the crown
Tiwalolu; ours is God
Tiwatope; our situation is worthy of thanks
Tolulope; Gods’ is thanks
Tolulore; gift which belongs to God
Toluwalase; God’s word is law
Toluwani; Gods belonging
Towobola; dip your hand into wealth
W
Wura; means gold
Wurade; gold of the crown
Wuraola; gold of wealth
Y
Ye; is the abbreviated form of Iya; mother/grandmother?
Yejide; mother has awoken
Yetunde; mother has returned again Yewande; mother looked for me 

SOURCE