THE STRANGE ONE

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THE STRANGE ONE

He is the talk of the town
Spoken of with so much scorn
By his peers, he is often jeered
No praise gets he from the aged

As rigid as Peter the hermit
He cares not what others say
As simple as the Great Gandhi
Without frown, he goes about his day

He moves with his head bent down
Never in a haste, never slowing down
Always cautious to lower his face
To avoid the mad world and its gaze

Come buddy, to a party must go
Painfully, but always, he says no
Hey look at that lovely ‘hoe’.
Lo and behold, his eyes are closed

Once, they queried him and demanded
Why not nod your head to this music
Gently, he shook his head and said
My mind is a temple, I cannot abuse it

They, at times, tell him to get a life
What do you even do to unwind?
He says books are his only friend
He spends time with unend

He is the talk of the town
None, in his presence, wants to be found
Many, out of his feats, know his nom
But still they call him the strange one

WHY WEAR A GARB?

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WHY WEAR A GARB?

Why wear a garb?
Only to cover your thorax
While speaking to others

Why wear a garb?
Only to hide your undies
While alighting from taxies

Why wear a garb?
Only to walk about
As if manoeuvring a death trap

Why wear garbage?
Only to be in discomfiture
Only to hide in contrition

Only to satisfy the society
Displease the Almighty
And in fact, put yourself in anxiety

DON’T DO IT !

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DON’T DO IT!

DO IT! DON’T DO IT!
THE VOICES KEEP COMING
GO ON! ARE YOU SILLY?
THE FORCES KEEP TUSSLING

THIS FEELING IS SO ANNOYING
THE THOUGHT, QUITE DISTURBING
OH! WHAT SHALL I DO?
WHICH VOICE, SHALL I LISTEN TO?

DO IT LAD
IT CAN’T BE THAT BAD
IF YOU ARE CAREFUL SO
NOBODY WILL KNOW

BUT IF I AM NOT?
PERCHANCE, I AM CAUGHT?
WHAT WILL ENSUE?
WHAT MIGHT I DO?

YOUR FAMILY WILL DISDAIN YOU
FRIENDS WILL FORSAKE YOU
YOU WILL DESPISE YOU
AND FOES WILL, YOU, RIDICULE

THE RISK IS TOO HIGH
I CANNOT TAKE IT
THE PRICE IS NOT NIGH
I CANNOT AFFORD IT

WHAT WILL I TELL MY LORD?
THAT I WAS A COWARD?
NOT BRAVE ENOUGH
TO REPRESS MY LUST?

DO IT! DON’T DO IT!
THE VOICES KEEP PASSING
THINK I’VE MADE MY VERDICT

TO WAIT TILL THE SECOND COMING


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ADEBAJO: A LOOK INTO HISTORY

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I do not know what came over me today – 14th of August, 2013. I just felt the urge to get to know more about the history of my family name, lineage and township. And I think it was worth it.

In this write-up, I will be taking a glimpse at the meaning and history of ‘Adebajo’, my surname; ‘Adekunle’, my first name; ‘Ago-Iwoye’, my hometown; and ‘Ebumawe’, the monarchical title of the Ago-Iwoye people.

My sources of information include my dad, Mr Nelson Adetola Adebajo, the son of Arowogbaaya (Ibipe township); my mom, Mrs Fatimah Kikelomo Adebajo (Imere township) and a book by Barrister J.O. Ajibola, ‘A Brief History Of Ago-Iwoye’, being a lecture delivered to a youth club at Ago-Iwoye court hall on Friday 30th December, 1966.

ADEBAJO

Many decades ago, in the era of slave-trade (19th century), an era infamous for its perilousness and during which a caring mother would hesitate before sending her child on an errand … a man called Ṣomade (the wicked ones have taken the crown) – grandfather to my dad, was abducted by the Ẹgbas to be sold to the whites as a slave. But the people of Ibipẹ* would not sit back and allow this to happen because Somade was not an ordinary man, he was from a royal background. They sent 3 slaves to Abẹokuta that they may be bartered for Ṣomade.
His return home was considered very special that his progenitors were named after the event. Ade bo ni ati ajo, the crown [king] has returned from the journey.

ADEKUNLE

In the past, I was often confused when I think about (or tell others) the surface translation of this name, which I bear. ‘Ade full for house’? 

Now if you ask me what it means, I can definitely tell you something more logical. And that is: this sort of name is found in royal households, but not just any. Ones in which princes (male heirs) abound, at least two [2]. Funny enough, in my family, there are four [4].

Other names that can replace it include Adedeji, Adepọju, Adedimeji, Adeṣubomi, Adeyinka, Aderogba, Adeṣupọ etc.

AGỌ-IWOYE

Before 1931, there was no place going by the name Agọ-Iwoye. The present Agọ-Iwoye, prior to this time, was simply known as Agọ (meaning camp). It was as a result of the efforts and petition of the Agọ-Iwoye Progress Union (inaugurated in 1926) that the town came to be known, both informally and officially, as Agọ-Iwoye, which means the ‘camp of healing’.

Why this name? The answer is 1831. The Gbedeke war of 1831 (or Iṣamuro war as called by the Ẹgbas), a war borne out of greed, tribalism and white egocentrism. The trend back in the days was that the whites enticed various lands to fight wars and raid one another, in order that there may be slaves available for them to buy. This war forced the people of Iwoye (not Ago-Iwoye) to flee for their dear lives, as the Egbas ruthlessly attacked and destroyed their land.

They pitched their tents in a new area known as Imọṣọsi (whose leader was Meyẹlu), finding only a few settlers there. Seven townships comprising of Ibipẹ, Iṣamuro, Idọdẹ, Odoṣinusi, Igan, Imosu, and Imere emigrated from Orile-Iwoye and settled at Ago. They rotated the central leadership between their various Baloguns (war-leaders). The first Balogun to be made leader was Balogun Meleki of Igan township.
This explains why Ago-Iwoye was once referred to as Agọ-Meleki.

However, when a British commissioner visited between 1893 and 1895, asking for the Baalẹ of the town, the then chief-Balogun, Ogunfowodu, became to be called Baalẹ and so was his successors. This went on until Oba Alaiyeluwa Akadi Adenugba was installed in 1932, as the first Ebumawe of Agọ-Iwoye.

EBUMAWE

The people of Idoko who were among the early settlers of Ondo worshipped spirits, and they hated twins whom they always put to death. At one time, Oduduwa had twin children, one a male and the other a female. Oduduwa sent both these twins and their mother away from his headquarters to the remote part of his kingdom so that they might not be killed (cf. Johnson’s History of the Yorubas, page 25), and they finally settled at Idoko.

The people of the District, knowing that they were from the Royal family, and recognising in them the essence of twin, called them ‘EBU-MARE’ and ‘EṢE-MARE’ respectively, Ebu and Eṣe both mean POTENT and MYSTERIOUS. ‘MARE’ means – HERE IS or HERE ARE. That is, these are potent and mysterious beings. These names later on became to be known as EBUMAWE and OṢEMAWE.

The female child settled at Ondo and became a ruler, while the male, Akingbade, travelled from Idoko, through Okun-Ori-Imedu, Epe, to Ijebu-Ode, and then to Wojaiye and Ibipe. The only settlers they found were the descendants of Sapoku, the Isamuro people who made him king. Hence, Akingbade became the first Ebumawe, and many others ruled after him until the Iwoye towns were destroyed by the Egba people in the Gbedeke war of 1831.

Extracted from ‘A brief history of Ago-Iwoye’ by J.O Ajibola (Page 19/20)

COMPILATION OF HON. OBAHIAGBON’S STAGGERING RELEASES

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HERE IS A COMPILATION OF TEN OF THE LEGENDARY AND CONTROVERSIAL PERSONALITY, HONOURABLE PATRICK OBAHIAGBON’S (ALIAS IGODOMIGODO), RELEASES ON NIGERIAN POLITY.

DON’T JUST READ WITH THE INTENT OF LAUGHING, ENDEAVOUR TO GAIN AS WELL.

ENJOY!

1. ON NIGERIA AT 52

As we celebrate our flag and shambolic autarky at 52, we must realise that Nigeria is still more of a geographic contrivance as has been
rightly posited by Chief Obafemi Awolowo. Not with our centrifugal
excrescences preponderating over our centripetal proclivities.
It’s a matter for mental pabulum that we are daily drifting into our ethnic cocoons. We still remain one country with disparate ethnic agendas and I can say it for the umpteenth time again that we must sit down in a sovereign national colloquy to discuss the basis for our nationhood.
Anything short of this is just vacuous scahiamachy.”
Patrick Obahiagbon

2. ON PROF. SOFOLUWE’s DEATH.

“I condole with the UNILAG Community on the recumb in quietus of the VC, Prof. Sofoluwe. The clerisy has lost a solitaire. “Prof. Sofoluwe’s passing is mere ephemeral recumbent hibernation; an
empyrean paradisiac rendezvous lies ahead. Heaven is the terminus,”
Patrick Obahiagbon On Being Disturbed By A Girl On Facebook

3. ON DISTURBANCES ON HIS FACEBOOK WALL

At long last,Sodom and Gomorrah don come tanda gidigba for my FB Wall.I beg make una help me beg one Sabinna with kpotoki body and her coquettish fidus achates when they dress in puris naturalibus for my wall say make them carry their fiddle.faddle commot go another piazza.I enter public disclaimer lest i swim in the legal aqua of
particeps criminis.

4. ON GOV. OSHIOMOLE’s VICTORY AGAINST TONY ANENIH.

“Amidst the great cosmogyral peregrinations of galaxies, amidst the great turmoil in the Land, there is still hope for the future. Congratulations the People’s Governor.
The Governor’s antecedents is the coherentific factor behind the Great People of Edos’ consensus verdict. Tony Anenih will be positively alabandical. Say no to God Fatherism.”

5. ON NIGERIAN PASTORS AND PRIVATE JETS

I cast my vote for Bishop Matthew Hassan Kukah and Pastor Tunde Bakare in their demosthenic vitriol against spiritual megalomaniacs whose modus vivendi has become increasingly byzantine and
repulsively narcissistic.We must all begin to deprecate this razzmatazz and Nestorian braggadocio in the “HOUSE OF
GOD”,because when there is no difference between the values of a Pastor and a typical Nigerian Politician,then it’s truly a
bolekaja ambience.

6. ON THE JUBILATION IN KADUNA OVER YAKOWA’S DEATH

“Whilst I feel tongue tied that we are witnessing another ‘air mishap’ that has taken the lives of fellow Nigerians, I am utterly shocked to hear of the jubilation in certain Northern political quarters and muslim youths in Kaduna State. Just too too cruddy and it is beyond the fugacious razzmatazz of the moment.
“I seriously call attention to the rutilanting and coruscating modus vivendi of Master Jesus the Christ and I dare pontificate that
save and until we viscerally emblematize the virtues of self-immolation, quintessential abnegation, eulogizeable simplicity, humility and immerse ourselves in a platonic emotionalism of agape love and communalistic service and head to
unity as one nation,”

7. AFTER LOSING HIS PRIMARY ELECTION.

‘This has made me suffused with emotional narcolepsy that the
homosapiens in d metro-political geographical enclave of Edo have opted for Owanbe-ing over legislative Quomodo dicis. Such a reckless display of narcissistic and flamboyant hedonism is capable of
encumbering our nascent democracy with insidious, repercussive and cataclysmic exigencies.

8. ON 2013 ASUU STRIKE

This ASUU strike is a miasma of a deprecable apothesis of an hemorrhaging plutocracy, cascadingly oozing into a malodorous excrescence of mobocracy.
With all termagant ossifying proclivities of a kakistocracy, our knowledgia centura is enveloped in a paraphlegic crinkum crankum.
Therefore ASUU,cest in dejavu, dejavu peret ologomabia.

9. ON PATIENCE D. JONATHAN AND THE RIVERS STATE CRISIS

Is the malodorous excrescence in Rivers state,cascadingly oozing out from erebus Dame,all about the satiation of a megalomaniacal presidential termagant?
Let someone please assist me in whispering to the Dame that Alagamus Paret,Ai Ai Num,Ai Ai Num Cest Daret,Opotere Alagamus…

AND LASTLY…

10. AN INTERVIEW WITH VANGUARD

What is the meaning of Igodomigodo? So many people would want to know?

Igodomigodo is a political sobriquet I have habilimented or if you like togarise my identity for a period of aeon to emblematize my culturico-spiritual fons et origo. It was an advertent stratagem to
cosmopolitanize my genealogical matrix and arcane trajectory since it was not by accident that I originated from the land of Igodomigodo. The interesting thing is that IGODOMIGODO, being the pristine
nomenclature of the Bini man, evokes in me the alacritous presence of the invisible “gods” of my progenitors which, by itself, invokes a luxuriation in an ancestral egregore of pristine resurgimento.

How did you actually come about the bombast with which you speak?

Well, this question can be answered from a bifurcated fons et origo.
One, I had a singular privilege of having a martinet for a father. My father was, and remains a very strict disciplinarian of puritanical and quixotic predilection. What that meant, my brother, in practical terms was that I never saw the streets of Benin outside my father’s compound after 7p.m., until I became a practising lawyer. I didn’t
know how Benin looked like after 7p.m., except of course when I had to go to school.
If you grew up under that type of ambience, you cannot but put your nose to the grindstone. And more germane was the fact that when my father traveled abroad, he brought with him a flyer to the effect that good speakers have ruled the world, and if you want to rule the world, you cannot but be a good speaker. I was very impressionable when he gave me this flyer which he had bought from London
and for me who have always had the primus mobile and gravitating force to want to be part and parcel of the political higgi haggar of my milieu, I said to myself that if being a good speaker was the
condition sine qua non for ruling the world, then I was going to do everything possible to be a good speaker and that was how I acclimatized myself very voraciously to the Students’ Companion and read all there was to read that came my way. It was indeed a period of mental lucubration and intellectual gymkhana but more fundamentally is the fact that – and I’ve always said this – for most people, the dictionary is a reference point; but, for me, for over 25years now, the dictionary is a vade mecum – constant companion that
is.

How?

I have spent nothing less than an hour on a daily basis on my dictionary for the past twenty five years and this could go from
the pedestrian dictionary to the Encyclopedia and even to the Encarta
dictionaries.

What purpose do you want to achieve with that? Just to speak, or to confuse people by being bombastic and verbose?

Let me tell you an incident that occurred that I want to bring under focal hiceps and biceps when I had the rare privilege to peregrinate through the green chambers, the House of Representatives, specifically.
I’m talking about when I had the opportunity to describe the intended
legislative gambadoism of my colleagues as amounting to legislative rascality. You remember I was to be committed to
parliamentary seppuku for that idiolect.

THANKS FOR READING!

THE POWER OF CULTURE TO CREATE A BETTER FUTURE

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What is it that has made man what he is? Led him to where he is today? What is it that has made him soar high above other animals? What is it that gives his short existence a purpose? The answer to these questions lies not only in his matchless nature and profound intellect, but in his pattern of behaviour, values, arts, morals, customs and beliefs; his way of adapting to nature; his culture.

Culture is said to be the oil that keeps the society running, the force that keeps humanity afloat. This explains why it has remained the focal point of studies relating to man and society. No doubt, culture functions to establish the identity of a people, distinguishing the white from the black, the Greeks from the Barbarians, the Americans from the red Indians. It helps in facilitating social integration, by giving a people a common goal and prescribing common means to attain such. Its understanding equally prevents prejudice and discrimination between persons of varying races. However, the crux of this write-up lies in how the good utilisation of culture has the tendency ‘to create a better future’. Not just a future-state of stability and equilibrium, but that of excellence and near-perfection.
The Yorubas and numerous other cultures, have a logically appealing moral-code and ways of peacefully resolving disputes. This system has been preserved mostly through ‘owe’ (proverbs), ‘alọ-apagbe’ (folktales), ‘ewọ’ (taboos) and ‘oriki’ (panegyrics). They fervently encourage hardwork, honesty and chastity. Their values are not cycled around luxury, but rather contentment and moderation. This is very germane because a state that gives room for materialism must inevitably welcome exploitation and wide-spread poverty.

Aside from diligence, Yorubas also value decency and the use of dignifying wears. This aspect of culture is observable from time immemorial. The Yorubas’ buba and agbada, Indian Sari, Japanese geisha and kimono, and even the western suit, all lend credence to this. Consequences inherent in the deviance from decency include an increase in crime rates, most especially sexual harassments, thereby creating an atmosphere of unrest not fit for development. It is also noteworthy that to combat crime and foster unity, the traditional communal spirit is invaluably expedient. Gone are the days when elders were duly revered, when goods can be sold without the seller around, when lives were sacred and properties safe. Those days can return if only we give room for culture.

Men travel from their native lands to others simply because of the unique language, scenery and culture existing there. Hence, if the culture of a place has been devoured by another, of what use is it to tourists and sightseers? Travel and tourism is, today, the largest services industry. According to the World Travel & Tourism Council, tourism, across the globe, supports 255 million jobs and generates 9 percent of world GDP. In fact, in Dubai, one of the most widely visited countries world-wide, tourism contributes up to 31% of her total GDP (emirates247.com). Also, in Nigeria, it’s been established that in 2012 alone, some 897,500 jobs were generated in the industry (businessdayonline.com). We can deduce from these figures that the propagation of a people’s culture can and actually does improve the standard of living of such people.

What’s more, social maladies of pollution and lack of drinkable water can be solved if cultural values are highly esteemed. This is because most cultures persuade against or even forbid the desecration of water bodies and other life-supporting resources deemed sacred. This in a way has promoted the actualisation of the 7th millennium development goal which is to “ensure environmental sustainability.”

Finally, I wish to assert that the culture of any and every society possesses the power to create a better and brighter future for all. As a matter of fact, this power is not acquired nor is it bestowed – it is inherent. Sadly however, this power has been hijacked by the forces of imperialism, immorality and materialism. And as it is self-evident that there can be no culture without man and neither can there be mankind without the concept of culture, the future remains gloomy unless man resolves to restore sanity, restore the ideals of humanity and restore the power of culture.