THE SOCIAL MEDIA: A TROJAN HORSE?

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SOCIAL MEDIA: A TROJAN HORSE?

‘Use, do not abuse, neither abstinence nor excess ever renders man happy’
~Voltaire.

Taking a stroll on the streets of Ibadan, I could not but see the various individuals, most especially youths, whose eyes are glued to the screens of their handsets. Some are seen smiling, some giggling and others knitting their brows. A person standing a few inches from them would in fact find it difficult to fathom the chain of thoughts running through their youthful minds; because they are in a totally distinct world, a world they have created for themselves, a world of bonding and disbanding, a world of freedom and facades. Certain people regard it as the world library, some call it the essential tool of globalization, others say it is the most prominent feature of the 21st century; social media is fast becoming or has become an integral part of human existence.

The social media has been defined by Wikipedia, the online encyclopaedia as the means of interaction among people in which they create, share and exchange information and ideas in virtual communities and networks.

The social media is fast spreading its appendages; it is proliferating every single day. This is evident in the facts that Facebook has more than 1.06 billion monthly active users world-wide, 5.3 million in Nigeria, Google reached a billion unique visitors worldwide as at May, 2011. Twitter has about 500 million total users. Very recently, YouTube has been reported to reach a whopping one billion monthly users. And these numbers are not in any way stagnant, they are increasing by the hour.

Hence, this is to suggest that whatever transpires on these media ought to be the concern of each and every one of us because even if we do not belong to any, which is of course nigh-impossible, a colossal percentage of human population is already trapped in its walls, and we will inevitably relate with these people.

The social media with its many benefits also has its disadvantages, or do they not say that ‘all must have a disadvantage that has an advantage?’ and ‘the greater the use, the worse the abuse.’ Today, the essence of the creation of social media has given way to a pervasive perversion. The media which were meant to facilitate unity, growth and progress have given way to the direct opposite. The media were created to facilitate unity but instead they seem to trigger disunity. They were created to inform people, rather they are misinforming them. They were created to entertain us, what we see is that we are in the process of getting entertained, getting tainted.
Matter-of-factly, all these irregularities are ensuing because, today, rather than use the social media, we are abusing it. We do not share the information that will be beneficial to others; neither do we seek information that will benefit us. The inexorable corollaries of this are myriad, and they have come in different forms.

One of such corollaries is time-wastage. People are so addicted to the various social media that we have, Facebook, Twitter, Google+, Nairaland, Eskimi, and so on, to the extent that everywhere they go, be it the workplace, lecture hall or restroom, they are never offline. In fact, we have those who have turned social networking into a ritual. The very first and last thing they do every day is chat. The situation even became worse when Research in motion limited, commonly known as RIM introduced the first blackberry phone in 1999. Blackberry which now has up to 80 million subscribers world-wide, was nicknamed ‘Crackberry’ which alludes to its excessive use by its owners and is a reference to the addictiveness of crack cocaine. It is established that an average Facebook uses nothing less than 8 hours on the network per year, but we all know that in Nigeria, people spend that same number of hours on the site per day. It is equally established, that most 2go users devote between 5 and 10 hours on the messenger every single day, in the hope that they will one day be crowned masters in the art of gossiping. Moving on to one of Nigeria’s most celebrated social networks which now has more than a million users: Nairaland. One remarkable feature of the site is that they record the aggregate number of hours a member spends there. I discovered, to my amazement, that we have an inestimable number of members on Nairaland who have spent up to a month on the site. Frosbel has spent 3 months and a day there, Maclatunji has spent 4 months and 10 days while Afam4eva has spent 6 months and 27 days. We all know what tangible things could achieved in a much shorter span of time.

The consequence of this immense amount of time wasted on social media every day is that it leads to lack of productivity and a drastic fall in National growth rate. Many idle politicians and celebrities have turned the social media into their personal library and a platform to express themselves unthinkingly and ludicrously. Notable examples include Peter Odemwingie, who turned twitter into his military base from which he shoots indiscriminately at his foes. He fought his club, country, coach, NFA and a complete sports editor all using twitter. We also have Mallam Nasir El-Rufai, who people believe only uses his Facebook page to criticise the ruling political party.
Another corollary of the abuse of social media is the simplification of crime. At this juncture, I would like us to cast our minds back to the murder of Miss Cynthia Osokogu, which occurred in July, 2012. The disheartening death could have been averted if only she used the Facebook more cautiously. People now seem to trust their Facebook pals more than their parents and siblings at home. They disclose information, which they can never tell their psychiatrist; to a person they have never met.

They fail to realise that Facebook is filled with real people, not just accounts and that it is now the workshop of scammers, rapists and serial murderers.

And again, an abuse of social media could and has also led to a profound corruption of morals. Half of the contents on Facebook are illicit. Even if you do not subscribe to them, we find that Facebook now notifies us if any of our friends like or comment on a pornographic image. Dating sites now everywhere; kids even tell lies concerning their age just to subscribe to them. It is expected and statistically proven that 12 percent of all sites are porn, 35 percent of all downloads are porn, kids first see porn online, on average, at age 11 and 20 percent of men watch porn at work. So when next you meet an internet addict, inquire about his online activities.

Aside from these, social media abuse similarly leads to a depreciating knowledge of Queen’s English. Many Nigerians now prefer to substitute the number 4 for ‘for’, letter ‘k’ for ‘okay’, ‘brb’ for ‘be right back’ among others, to the extent that it has permeated our formal usage.
Furthermore, this same social malady has been proven to cause health and psychological hazards. It causes, or fastens the rate at which diseases such stroke, blood pressure, cold, dementia and other cognitive problems occur. It also has psychological impacts like addiction, distress, anxiety, boredom and loneliness.

Finally, through the social media, rumours and denigrating news now spread like wildfire. Quintessential examples include the ‘acid rain’, ‘beans poisoned by Boko-haram’, ‘phone-call that causes instant death’, ‘do not wear red because Pastor Adeboye said so’, and most recently, the ‘my oga at the top’ saga. The unnecessary panic and foofaraw caused by these news is accelerated with the activities of idle hands who have found work online. No wonder countries like China, Syria and out rightly banned Facebook. China even went to the extent also proscribing YouTube and Twitter.

Ad summum, the compendium of all my contention is that we should never risk social dysphoria by abusing the social media, if we truly desire to acquire a sense of euphoria and a state of utopia. The social media is actually valuable and blameless; it is we, the users that made it obnoxious and counter-productive. Hence, one of the things that will determine how well the future generations will live is how well we use the social media.

THANKS!

ASCENSUS ARMATI

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ASCENSUS ARMATI
THE RISE OF THE ARMED
* * * * * * * * * * * * *
FROM CAPE TOWN TO TUNISIA
FROM DAKAR TO SOMALIA
IN SHACKLES, WE COUNT OUR DAYS
OUR NEMESIS, OUR COMRADES

GREETINGS TO THE FREE BLACK CLAN
LUCKY IS HE BORN OF AN ABBYSINIAN
FOR HE NOR HIS GREAT GRANDFATHER
TASTED FROM THE WHITEMAN’S DANDER

IN SHACKLES, WE COUNT OUR DAYS
ALAS! SOON THAT PASSED AWAY
NO DOUBT, IT IS WAS NOT WITHOUT
MANY A KINSMAN’S BLACKOUT

NEW TO LIBERTY, WE REJOICED
OUR HOPES FOR THE UNKNOWN, WE VOICED
OUR IGNORANCE DEFENDED OUR REALISING
AS A WAR ENDS, OTHERS BEGIN

ATTENTION!
AFRICANS ARE AT TENSION
AT THE ECHO OF THE TRYING WHISTLE
AT THE SIGHT OF THE UNIFORMS’ METTLE

ATTENTION?
THIS IS AN ABOMINATION
A SHOULD-BE VIOLATION
WARNS THE AGED NATION

CORRUPTION IS EVERYWHERE, THEY SAID
THE ARISTOS ARE SHADY, THEY PLEADED
WE HAD NO CHOICE EXCEPT
ONCE AGAIN, SHACKLES, TO ACCEPT

OUR COMMON WEALTH BECAME THEIRS
THEIR FAMILY GLITCHES, OURS
ONE REGIME GIVES UP TO ANOTHER
AS DOGS DEVOURING ONE ANOTHER

OUR PRECIOUS GOLDS, THEY WITHHOLD
OUR AFFLICTION, EYES CANNOT BEHOLD
OUR STORY COULD NEVER BE TOLD
BY GREEK WRITERS OF DAYS OLD

ONCE IN A COMET COME
ONE WITH EQUITIES AND WORLDY WISDOM
WILL THINK OF THE MULTITUDE
AND GIVE SWAY TO UNBOUND QUIETUDE

GONE ARE THOSE WOEFUL DAYS
NOW ALL WE HAVE ARE TALES
GOOD RIDDANCE TO KHAKICRACY
WELCOME, ADVOCATES OF KLEPTOCRACY

THINKING OUR FUTURE BRIGHT ONCE MORE
WE HAD NO IDEA WHAT IS TO COME
THE MILTANTS HAVE SHED THEIR FURS
AS THE WHITE FOLKS, THEY BE SOLIDLY WITH US

‘MY OGA AT THE TOP’: A MESSAGE TO ALL

‘MY OGA AT THE TOP’: A MESSAGE TO ALL

 

Channels TV: what is the website of NSCDC?

Shem: the website of NSC…NSCDC…yes will be made known…I cannot categorically tell you one now…because the one that…

Channels TV: (cuts in) you have multiple websites?

Shem: wait, wait…the one we are going to make use of, I am not the one that is going to create it.

Channels TV: see, the question is what is your website?

Shem: (cuts in) waaait , the one we are going to make use of…is go…is going to remain known by (raising right index finger) my oga at the top. I can’t announce one now and my oga says it’s another one.

Channels TV: you mean NSCDC has multiple websites?

Shem: see, we cannot have multiple websites, but the one that…that…my oga will say

Channels TV: not the one for employment. what is your website now. The one you use normally. Your official website. If you want to know about NSCDC, what website do you go to?

Shem: okay, if you want to know about NSCDC as at now?

Channels TV: exactly.

Shem: okay, ww.nscdc

Channels TV: yes

Shem: yes, so… (Coughs). That’s all.

Channels TV: ww.nscdc? …that’s it?

Shem: yes.

* * * * * * * * * *

A person willing to be acquainted with the leading distraction in Nigeria need not go far before he hears someone shout; ‘you are my oga at the top’, ‘my website is dobiyu dobiyu dot daz all’, ‘lemme first of all ask my oga at the top’ and so on. Or perhaps he might even be fortunate to catch a glimpse of one of the polos and shirts customised to celebrate this act of; shall we say mediocrity, ignominy or spirited witlessness? We can logically conclude that a Nigerian who is unaware about the tale is either among the 71.57% of Nigerians without internet access or one of the 55.3% without access to TV.

The topical hilarious, yet disastrous ‘my oga at the top’ saga is one which, in my sincere opinion, should oblige us to engage in deep introspection on our predicament as a nation.

Some are of the view that Mr Obafaiye Shem, the Lagos state commandant of the Nigeria Security and Civil Defence Corps and the icon in this drama, ought to resign or better still be sacked for committing such a weighty blooper. But then, I think that this should not be the case. The only flaw people who are critical of the man can point out is that which concerns the organisation’s website address; which I frankly deem trivial and negligible. I mean, the man has just recently celebrated 100 days in office and a URL address is one of the things he should not be bothered with, especially giving the office he holds. The only problem I have is his trying to bluff his way out rather than just admitting his unawareness, and then his constant reference to his ‘oga at the top’, whoever that is.

Watching the video again, I could not but laugh at the laughable, unimpressive and preposterous manner in which Mr Shem arrogantly answered the question. He obviously seemed uncomfortable and fidgety. Perchance, he was only caught up with the dilemma principle.

Some also opine that the startling diffusion of the incident is because of the activities of companies who want to divert attention from the content of the interview. However, I beg to disagree. The stuff has gone viral because Nigerian cyber-surfers want it that way. The question we should ask ourselves is why do Nigerians want it that way. My answer: poverty and idleness. Most Nigerians have little or nothing to do. We needed something to while away time, and ‘our oga at the top’ has come to give us just that.

Finally and finally, my message to all and sundry is one, to not just be the best in whatever it is we are doing, but also to have little knowledge on other things as well. Because, seriously speaking, it could have been anybody. Mr Shem, surprisingly has three degrees to his credit, yet he is yet to master the art of speechifying. This makes one wonder how he successfully scaled through his past interviews. Two, we should endeavour to take note of little subtle details because at times they matter more than the glaring ones. Let us not be extremely conservative to the extent of not paying attention to important things such as the format URL addresses take. Three, it never pays not to know a thing, and claim or act as if you know it. If you do this, you will only succeed in making a ridicule of yourself and making your ignorance more apparent. Lastly, we all know that in Nigeria, one needs ‘ogas at the top’ to go places, but never attempt to over-extol them while giving public addresses, most especially on channels TV. 🙂

HERE WE GO AGAIN !

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HERE WE GO AGAIN!

‘’Adewole … Ole! Adewole … Ole! Adewole … Ole! ’’
This is the chant that permeated the cool breeze of the serene Thursday night atmosphere on the 14th of March, in the various halls of residence in the University of Ibadan, especially in Zik, Indy and Mellanby hall where I reside. As the saying goes; ‘boys are not smiling’.

It is uncommon to see greatest UItes come out in the open to vent their grievances and resentment. However, on this day, it was absolutely warranted. They were pushed to the wall, and had to fight back. The remote cause of the protest is one that has been confronted in recent past, and which has led to a total cessation of academic activities. It is the issue of sporadic power supply.

I find it awfully lugubrious that the premier university, ‘the first and the best’ is, unlike many other residential universities in Nigeria, unable to boast of constant power supply. Residents of Teddar hall {the VC’s hall} and Mellanby hall {the premier hall} had to succumb to two whole weeks of darkness and near inactivity, while their counterparts in other halls enjoy the little electricity supplied them.

Despite the efforts of the hall excos, writing letters and attending meetings, the school authority still maintains that the students’ plight is none of its concern. The installed inverters that the VC always brags of as an epic achievement were rendered redundant as there was no power to charge them. The kitchenettes were deserted. The reading rooms too had suddenly gone untenanted. Only the high-spirited ones went there with their dimmed torches and reading lamps. The scenario is even worse in the various borehole sites; with long queues of buckets in the few places where water is rushing. Students move from one hall to another just to get water; and cases in which early-morning classes are missed is not uncommon.

Students from the affected halls of residence also have to visit neighbouring halls to press their clothes. The various lecture theatres are always filled with long strings of extension cables brought by desperate students who had run out of better alternatives. Aside from this, UItes became more cautious in the unnecessary usage of devices that depend on light, particularly mobile phones. Intellectual scholars have now forcefully metamorphosed into savages, as they now roar jubilantly to celebrate the slightest indication of power.

It is worthy of note that rumours abound that the reason for the power outage is that the school authority plans to save money by using less than the 1 megawatt allocated to the university. It is of course added that this is just to give room for embezzlement.

Without further ado, the authorities vindicated the popular saying that ‘the only language government seems to understand is protest and strike’, by supplying the much-anticipated power just a few minutes after the peaceful but potent protest started. However, this is not to suggest that the predicament UItes are facing in terms of power supply is, in any way, over.

A few days later, on the 18th of February, we experienced a déjà vu. A similar procession is held by students from Mellanby and Teddar, and again, the light was brought almost immediately to calm the nerves of the infuriated students, but the students have refused to be deceived. As a matter of fact, as I write this in my room {09:10pm}, scores of mellanbites are outside shouting; ‘We must go! We must go! We must go!’ and ‘no bobo!’

The questions that cross my mind now are: Is this supposed to be seen in the acclaimed premier university of Nigeria? For how long will we continue like this? For how long will power supply in the University of Ibadan be appalling, sickening and utterly nothing to write home about?

THE SIGNIFICANT ROLE OF PHILOSOPHY IN THE NIGERIAN PREDICAMENT.

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WHAT I CONSIDER AS THE SIGNIFICANT ROLE OF PHILOSOPHY IN THE NIGERIAN PREDICAMENT.

First and foremost, philosophy is a discipline without a universally and univocally acceptable definition. However, we can, ad hoc, say that it is a (critical) criticism of the ideas we live by {H.S Staniland}. Another word, needing clarification, ‘Nigeria’, is a geo-political entity known by many names, viz. ‘the sleeping giant’, ‘the mistake of 1914’, and ‘the marriage of misfortune’ etc. All these cognomen point to the widely held and spot-on belief that Nigeria is a failed or better still a failing nation.

No doubt, Nigeria is, today, passing through a very challenging phase in its life-span. And various individuals have suggested ways by which we sail through this storm. The question now is, is the knowledge of philosophy, the possession of the ‘philosophic spirit’ and the daily application of philosophical principles, in any way germane to Nigeria’s development as a nation? I reply with a capital affirmation.

Nigerians, today, nurture numerous dangerous and detrimental world-views. Examples of such world-views include, ‘governance is nothing but an opportunity to live large and embezzle’, ‘our votes do not count’, ‘one day, E go better’, ‘leadership is the birth right of Hausas’, ‘Nigeria can never prosper if she does not disunite’ among many others. Knowingly or unknowingly, these ideas have a impeding effect on our voyage of national development. The work of philosophy is to rectify them. It will rectify the Yoruba extravagance, the Ibo materialism and the Hausa megalomania.

Philosophy helps us, not only to be able to think rationally and coherently, but to be able to act in conformity with our thought. This trait is something that the Nigerian populace and government apparently lack, as we have find ourselves engaging day in day out in improvident, impolitic and immoral acts. We do not aim before we shoot, we do not look before we leap, and we do not consider the consequences of our decisions before we make them. Nigerians no longer think. We just accept whatever we are offered without considering if it is deleterious or derisory. We obey the state without considering whether it is appropriate or the state even deserves it. We pay outrageous taxes without asking if we benefit from them or not. We allow ourselves to be easily deceived by ‘men of God’ who are only interested in our earnings. People engage in corruption, misappropriation and cultism because of this paucity in critical thinking. We are a set of people, if not the only one, who ‘suffer and yet smile’. All these are leading to our downfall, but we are oblivious to this fact.

This is where philosophy comes in. Philosophy inculcates us with the spirit of non-dogmatism, objectivity and amity. Imagine a judicial system free from bias and deliberate injustice, an executive that makes logical and pro-people policies within the quickest time possible, a legislature that actually represents the interest of the masses and people who do not have to be policed before they obey state rules and regulations. All these are possible if only we give philosophy the chance.

Imagine a Nigeria ruled by philosophers most especially ethicists such as Epictetus and Plato, and where the citizenry reflect the Socratic dispositions concerning reflective thoughts and loyalty to the state. If this is the case, then it is not possible for the government to make policies that are either harsh or seem to have been made by kindergarten pupils. It is not possible for the government to expend one billion naira on the presidential nourishment annually. It is not possible for the government to even contemplate the removal of fuel subsidy and many other austere policies Nigerians have experienced and are still experiencing.

 

In summation, I am of the view that philosophy is expedient to Nigeria in her endeavour to achieve National unity, peace and progress, and it has a great role to play in the present predicament we, the people of Nigeria, find ourselves.

SHALL WE PARDON THE HEEDLESS PARDONER?

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SHALL WE PARDON THE HEEDLESS PARDONER?
‘’corruption is like a ball of snow, once it sets rolling it must increase’’
Charles C. Colton

The recent show of ineptitude by the Jonathan led administration has earned sundry denigrations from across the nation and beyond. The show I speak of is none other than the presidential pardon granted to Chief Diepreye Alamieyeseigha, a former governor of Bayelsa state, and some seven others. The reason for the intense criticism received by this outlandish move, most especially from the Anti-corruption network, coalition against corrupt leaders (CACOL) and the United States, is not far-fetched. The minute percentage of public opinion that suggest that there was absolutely nothing wrong with the pardon have as their pretext the ‘facts’ that due process was followed, Alamieyeseigha is a great asset to the nation and presidential pardon is a common practice across the globe.

Eight years back, Alamieyeseigha was accused of accumulating (outside Nigeria) known properties, bank accounts, investments and cash exceeding £10m in worth. His portfolio of foreign assets included accounts with five banks in the UK and further accounts with banks in Cyprus, Denmark and the United states; four London properties acquired for a total of £4.8m; a Cape town harbour penthouse acquired for almost £1m, possible assets in the United states, and almost £1m stored in cash in one of his London properties.

This same individual is also infamous for allegedly jumping bail in London by dressing like a woman, to return to Nigeria. In point of fact, the corrupt activities engaged in by Alamieyeseigha are so titanic that they are still under investigation by the governments of Britain, United States, South Africa, Bahamas and Seychelles as well as the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime and the World Bank under the Stolen Assets Recovery Initiative.

Hence, indubitably, the past record of Chief Alamieyeseigha is one that is one that flooded with illegality; and to associate with such person, let alone support him, is a pointer to the fact you are no better. A good leader, especially one who claims to be fervently fighting corruption, ought to not only distant himself from such personalities but also publicly show his discontent with their ill actions.

I strongly believe that the action taken by the federal government, on the advice of the National council of state is either ill-judged or externally instigated. I even find it difficult to see the expediency of the so-called National council of state in this regard, as the President will the one to suggest names of to-be-pardoned convicts, and he will also be the one to approve. To free an adjudged criminal is to officially formalise crime and corruption. It is akin to giving the green light to others contemplating on engaging in the same thing, saying to them, ‘worry not, we are firmly behind you’.

The fact that the constitution {in §175} gives room for a presidential prerogative of mercy is not a sufficient rationalization of what the president, in the person of Goodluck Jonathan, did. Legal reinforcement must not be mistaken for moral reinforcement. The pardon was obviously not ‘pro bono publico’, neither is it in line with rational thought. Apart from this, it is my believe that the convention is that presidential pardons are only given to those who commit political but not criminal crimes.

It is now glaring that corruption in Nigeria is not just as a result of the blemish that subsists in the judiciary, it is mostly due to the lack of will of the government to sincerely fight it. We have hundreds, if not thousands of Ibori’s, Bode’s and Alamieyeseigha’s in Nigeria. For us to luckily catch up with one of them should be a source of joy. In essence, revoking such a noteworthy achievement is like the situation of a woman who, after having sought for one for decades, is delivered of a child and then immediately kills it.

In a nutshell, I not only see this appalling and impolitic governmental move ‘as a setback in the fight against corruption’ as suggested by the American government, or as ‘great disservice to upcoming generations’ as averred by Dino Melaye, but as an affront on the machinery of justice and the intelligence of the Nigerians at large.

THE MANIFEST EVIDENCE

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THE MANIFEST EVIDENCE!

‘Quod non apparet non est’; that is the philosophy of some people. If they hear about it, they will say ‘seeing is believing’. If they are privileged to see it, they will say ‘this is not sufficient to convince us, we need to see more’. THIS is the trait of no other than hypocrites. It is akin to the story of a man who lives in a dilapidated house, and then after a tireless demand for succour the state decides to demolish it and build a new strong state-of-the-art home for him. But rather than relocating to his new home, the man still clings to the old rubble.

On a Tuesday, the 26th day of February to be exact, something peculiar transpired in Queen Elizabeth II hall, University of Ibadan. A 200 level student of Bio-chemistry who goes by the name, Ola Kareem Khayrah, was visited by her mom and given some chunks of raw meat. Later on, as she was boiling the meats, the intriguing incident took place: the name of God, as it is universally used by Arabs and Muslims, appears on one of the chunks.

Relating it, in my presence, some hours later, at the Dawah Enlightenment programme organised by the Muslim students’ society of the university, Khayrah had this to say; ‘’my mommy brought raw beef for me in Queen’s hall. I took the meat to the meat to the kitchenette to boil. As the meat started to simmer, an inscription of Allah’s name in Arabic language {الله} began to appear on a piece of the meat. The more the meat boiled, the clearer the inscription became. I then decided to fry that slice of meat, perhaps, the name will disappear. Lo! It became more engraved on the meat after frying. The experience really shocked me.’’

It is worthy of note that this is not the first time something like this would happen, neither is it the second, fifth nor tenth I have personally seen. We have seen and heard of related cases in other parts of the globe, but none ever this nigh. There is the case of the tree bowing towards the Ka’aba, the child born with Arabic inscriptions, the cactus plant forming ‘Allah’, the mosque that withstood a great seismic activity amongst many others.

One au fait with the Glorious Qur’an ought not to be flummoxed by the happening as it is indelibly stated in the divine scripture that ‘we will show them Our signs in the universe and in their own selves, until it becomes manifest to them that this [Qur’an, Islam] is the truth…’ {Q41, V53}

Verily, Islam is the only true religion endorsed by the Almighty. It is the only solution to all worldly snags. It is the only source of salvation. If only we did but know, those of us yet to accept Islam as the only genuine guidance for mankind would do so, and those who have, would hold it dearly in order to secure an eternity of peace and rest of mind.

Ad summum, as is the catch phrase of legal minds, ‘res ipsa loquitur’: ‘the thing speaks for itself’. There is absolutely no need for unnecessary elucidation and lengthy literature, in order to underscore what is already evident. And like I always say, ‘a word is enough for the wise, and a million chapters will never suffice a fool.’

‘Whoever goes right, then he goes right only for the benefit of his own self. And whoever goes astray, then, he goes astray to his own loss…’ {Q17, V15}